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2017年大学英语考试模拟卷

2020年大学英语考点真题库

2017年大学英语考试模拟卷

  • 本卷共分为1大题50小题,作答时间为180分钟,总分100分,60分及格。
  • 试卷来源:易哈佛教育

一、单项选择题(共50题,每题2分。每题的备选项中,只有一个最符合题意)

7.Questions 29 to 30 are based on the following news. At the end of the news item, you will be given 10 seconds to answer the questions. Where did the first bombing take place

A.In the headquarters of the city.
B.In an advertising agency.
C.The federal police agency.
D.In a residential neighborhoo

11.Questions 14 to 17 are based on the following passage. At the end of the passage, you will be given 20 seconds to answer the questions. What did Edwards Land invent

A.A new kind of film.
B.An automatic printer.
C.A cheap device of developing film at home.
D.An "instant" camera that develops its own film.

12.Which of the following is a compound-complex sentence

A. If you want me to clean your windows, please give me a week’s notice, for I am very busy this month.
B. Please give me a week’s notice and then I’ll come to clean your windows in time, because I am very busy this month.
C. If you want me to clean your windows and have them repaired, please give me a week’s notice.
D. Please give me a week’s notice and then I’ll come to clean your windows in time, for I am very busy this mont

13.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.detaching
B.dictating
C.modeling
D.monitoring

16.______ left before the deadline, it does not seem likely that Jimmy will accomplish the job.

A. With so short time
B. Although such a short time
C. With such a short time
D. It is such a short time

17."Mirror worlds" is only one of David Gelernter’s big ideas. Another is "lifestreams"—in essence, vast electronic diaries. "Every document you create and every document other people send you are stored in your lifestream," he wrote in the mid-1990s together with Eric Freeman, who produced a doctoral thesis on the topic. Prating electronic documents in chronological order, they said, would make it easier for people to manage all their digital output and experiences. Lifestreams have not yet replaced the desktop on personal computers, as Mr. Gelernter had hoped. Indeed, a software start-up to implement the idea folded in 2004. But today something quite similar can be found all over the web in many different forms. Blogs are essentially electronic diaries. Personal newsfeeds are at the heart of Facebook and other social networks. A torrent of short text messages appears on Twitter. Certain individuals are going even further than Mr. Gelernter expected. Some are digitising their entire offices, including pictures, bills and correspondence. Others record their whole life. Gordon Bell, a researcher at Microsoft, puts everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented in his "local cyberspace". Yet others "log" every aspect of their lives with wearable cameras. The latest trend is "life-tracking". Practitioners keep meticulous digital records of things they do: how much coffee they drink, how much work they do each day, what books they are reading, and so on. Much of this is done manually by putting the data into a PC or, increasingly, a smartphone. But people are also using sensors, mainly to keep track of their vital signs, for instance to see how well they sleep or how fast they run. The first self-trackers were mostly über-geeks fascinated by numbers. But the more recent converts simply want to learn more about themselves, says Gary Wolf, a technology writer and co-founder of a blog called "The Quantified Self". They want to use technology to help them identify factors that make them depressed, keep them from sleeping or affect their cognitive performance. One self-tracker learned, for instance, that eating a lot of butter allowed him to solve arithmetic problems faster. A market for self-tracking devices is already emerging. Fitbit and Greengoose, two start-ups, are selling wireless accelerometers that can track a user’s physical activity. Zeo, another start-up, has developed an alarm clock that comes with a headband to measure people’s brainwave activity at night and chart their sleep on the web. As people create more such self-tracking data, firms will start to mine them and offer services based on the result. Xobni, for example, analyses people’s inboxes ("xobni" spelled backwards) to help them manage their e-mail and contacts. It lists them according to the intensity of the electronic relationship rather than in alphabetical order. Users are sometimes surprised by the results, says Jeff Bonforte, the firm’s boss. "They think it’s creepy when we list other people before their girlfriend or wife.\ According to the passage, "lifestream" are ______.

A.documents about an individual daily life
B.software storing electronic diaries
C.streams in one’s life
D.a great idea about putting electronic documents in time order

18.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.candidate
B.opponent
C.person
D.representative

19.This is the 12th book of poems in about 50 years of writing by a great Northern Irish poet who is now in his eighth decade, and who recently recovered from a serious illness. Ageing and that brush with death have profoundly marked this new collection by Seamus Heaney. The change has stripped the poetry back to spare concentration on the small things of life—an old suit, the filling of a fountain pen, the hug that didn’t happen—which then open up to ever fuller significance, the more closely they are examined. It has also made the poems easier to engage with: there are no puzzling Ulsterisms, for instance. Complications have been tossed aside. Words are no longer delved into for their etymological significance as they were in the 1970s. Now they are caressed for their mellifluousness. The collection feels personal—as if it had a compelling need to be written. A decade and a half ago Mr. Heaney told The Economist that once the evil banalities of sectarianism seemed to be receding, his verse was able to admit the "big words" with which poetry had once abounded, soul and spirit, for example. In this collection both are present, at some level. The words describing a simple act—the passing of meal in sacks by aid workers onto a trailer—in the title poem, "Human Chain", transform this 12-line poem into a kind of parable. There is the collective, shared human burden of the act itself—the "stoop and drag and drain" of the heavy lifting—and then there is the wonderful letting go: "Nothing surpassed/That quick unburdening." Is the poet talking about the toil of life, and the aftermath of that toil The poems snatch precious remembered moments. They linger over the sweetness of particulars—vetch, the feel of an eel on a line. They pay attention to the heightened ritual of everyday things. The lines are short but move at a gentle pace and need to be read slowly, as the verse drifts back and forth over its country setting like a long-legged fly on a stream. Above all, and this is an odd thing to say of words on a page, the book feels like handcrafted work. Time and again Mr. Heaney returns to the image of the pen. He began his long career writing of such a pen, nestling snug as a gun between finger and thumb. The gun, we hope, is history. The pen still nestles, fruitfully. What is the distinction between the 12th book of poems and others by Seamus Heaney

A.Writing style.
B.The change of tepics.
C.An old suit vs. a new one.
D.The degree of importanc

20.In the digital realm, things seem always to happen the wrong way round What does the sentence "things seem always to happen the wrong way round" (in Paragraph 1) mean

A.New problems arise from the development of the digital technology.
B.Google should save all the books in its web.
C.Websites should be kept for ever.
D.Things turn out to be wron

21.A paradox of education is that presenting information in a way that looks easy to learn often has the opposite effect. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people are forced to think hard about what they are shown they remember it better, so it is worth looking at ways this can be done. And a piece of research about to be published in Cognition, by Daniel Oppenheimer, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his colleagues, suggests a simple one= make the text conveying the information harder to read. Dr. Oppenheimer recruited 28 volunteers aged between 18 and 40 and asked them to learn, from written descriptions, about three "species" of extraterrestrial alien, each of which had seven features. This task was meant to be similar to learning about animal species in a biology lesson. It used aliens in place of actual species to be certain that the participants could not draw on prior knowledge. Half of the volunteers were presented with the information in difficult-to-read fonts (12-point Comic Sans MS 75% greyscale and 12-point Bodoni MT 75% greyscale). The other half saw it in 16-point Arial pure-black font, which tests have shown is one of the easiest to read. Participants were given 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists. They were then distracted with unrelated tasks for a quarter of an hour or so, before being asked questions about the aliens, such as "What is the diet of the Pangerish" and "What colour eyes does the Norgletti have" The upshot was that those reading the Arial font got the answers right 72.8% of the time, on average. Those forced to read the more difficult fonts answered correctly 86.5% of the time. The question was, would this result translate from the controlled circumstances of the laboratory to the unruly environment of the classroom It did. When the researchers asked teachers to use the technique in high-school lessons on chemistry, physics, English and history, they got similar results. The lesson, then, is to make text books harder to read, not easier. Which of the following statements is true

A.The easier the information is presented, the better people can memorize.
B.No experiments have proved the paradox of education.
C.The information harder to read impresses people most.
D.Daniel Oppenheimer works in Cognition.

22.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.embodied
B.enriched
C.implanted
D.included

23."Mirror worlds" is only one of David Gelernter’s big ideas. Another is "lifestreams"—in essence, vast electronic diaries. "Every document you create and every document other people send you are stored in your lifestream," he wrote in the mid-1990s together with Eric Freeman, who produced a doctoral thesis on the topic. Prating electronic documents in chronological order, they said, would make it easier for people to manage all their digital output and experiences. Lifestreams have not yet replaced the desktop on personal computers, as Mr. Gelernter had hoped. Indeed, a software start-up to implement the idea folded in 2004. But today something quite similar can be found all over the web in many different forms. Blogs are essentially electronic diaries. Personal newsfeeds are at the heart of Facebook and other social networks. A torrent of short text messages appears on Twitter. Certain individuals are going even further than Mr. Gelernter expected. Some are digitising their entire offices, including pictures, bills and correspondence. Others record their whole life. Gordon Bell, a researcher at Microsoft, puts everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented in his "local cyberspace". Yet others "log" every aspect of their lives with wearable cameras. The latest trend is "life-tracking". Practitioners keep meticulous digital records of things they do: how much coffee they drink, how much work they do each day, what books they are reading, and so on. Much of this is done manually by putting the data into a PC or, increasingly, a smartphone. But people are also using sensors, mainly to keep track of their vital signs, for instance to see how well they sleep or how fast they run. The first self-trackers were mostly über-geeks fascinated by numbers. But the more recent converts simply want to learn more about themselves, says Gary Wolf, a technology writer and co-founder of a blog called "The Quantified Self". They want to use technology to help them identify factors that make them depressed, keep them from sleeping or affect their cognitive performance. One self-tracker learned, for instance, that eating a lot of butter allowed him to solve arithmetic problems faster. A market for self-tracking devices is already emerging. Fitbit and Greengoose, two start-ups, are selling wireless accelerometers that can track a user’s physical activity. Zeo, another start-up, has developed an alarm clock that comes with a headband to measure people’s brainwave activity at night and chart their sleep on the web. As people create more such self-tracking data, firms will start to mine them and offer services based on the result. Xobni, for example, analyses people’s inboxes ("xobni" spelled backwards) to help them manage their e-mail and contacts. It lists them according to the intensity of the electronic relationship rather than in alphabetical order. Users are sometimes surprised by the results, says Jeff Bonforte, the firm’s boss. "They think it’s creepy when we list other people before their girlfriend or wife.\ Which of the following statements is INCORRECT about "lifestream"

A.It is a big idea of David Gelernter.
B.It can substitute the desktop on personal computers.
C.It is not the only one that can record our life over the web.
D.It’s expected to store picture and bills as well.

24."Mirror worlds" is only one of David Gelernter’s big ideas. Another is "lifestreams"—in essence, vast electronic diaries. "Every document you create and every document other people send you are stored in your lifestream," he wrote in the mid-1990s together with Eric Freeman, who produced a doctoral thesis on the topic. Prating electronic documents in chronological order, they said, would make it easier for people to manage all their digital output and experiences. Lifestreams have not yet replaced the desktop on personal computers, as Mr. Gelernter had hoped. Indeed, a software start-up to implement the idea folded in 2004. But today something quite similar can be found all over the web in many different forms. Blogs are essentially electronic diaries. Personal newsfeeds are at the heart of Facebook and other social networks. A torrent of short text messages appears on Twitter. Certain individuals are going even further than Mr. Gelernter expected. Some are digitising their entire offices, including pictures, bills and correspondence. Others record their whole life. Gordon Bell, a researcher at Microsoft, puts everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented in his "local cyberspace". Yet others "log" every aspect of their lives with wearable cameras. The latest trend is "life-tracking". Practitioners keep meticulous digital records of things they do: how much coffee they drink, how much work they do each day, what books they are reading, and so on. Much of this is done manually by putting the data into a PC or, increasingly, a smartphone. But people are also using sensors, mainly to keep track of their vital signs, for instance to see how well they sleep or how fast they run. The first self-trackers were mostly über-geeks fascinated by numbers. But the more recent converts simply want to learn more about themselves, says Gary Wolf, a technology writer and co-founder of a blog called "The Quantified Self". They want to use technology to help them identify factors that make them depressed, keep them from sleeping or affect their cognitive performance. One self-tracker learned, for instance, that eating a lot of butter allowed him to solve arithmetic problems faster. A market for self-tracking devices is already emerging. Fitbit and Greengoose, two start-ups, are selling wireless accelerometers that can track a user’s physical activity. Zeo, another start-up, has developed an alarm clock that comes with a headband to measure people’s brainwave activity at night and chart their sleep on the web. As people create more such self-tracking data, firms will start to mine them and offer services based on the result. Xobni, for example, analyses people’s inboxes ("xobni" spelled backwards) to help them manage their e-mail and contacts. It lists them according to the intensity of the electronic relationship rather than in alphabetical order. Users are sometimes surprised by the results, says Jeff Bonforte, the firm’s boss. "They think it’s creepy when we list other people before their girlfriend or wife.\ People can use self-tracking to ______.

A.count out the quantity of coffee they drink a day
B.help .them run faster
C.help them or learn about themselves
D.do the arithmetic problems

25.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.as soon as
B.then
C.whereas
D.while

26.A paradox of education is that presenting information in a way that looks easy to learn often has the opposite effect. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people are forced to think hard about what they are shown they remember it better, so it is worth looking at ways this can be done. And a piece of research about to be published in Cognition, by Daniel Oppenheimer, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his colleagues, suggests a simple one= make the text conveying the information harder to read. Dr. Oppenheimer recruited 28 volunteers aged between 18 and 40 and asked them to learn, from written descriptions, about three "species" of extraterrestrial alien, each of which had seven features. This task was meant to be similar to learning about animal species in a biology lesson. It used aliens in place of actual species to be certain that the participants could not draw on prior knowledge. Half of the volunteers were presented with the information in difficult-to-read fonts (12-point Comic Sans MS 75% greyscale and 12-point Bodoni MT 75% greyscale). The other half saw it in 16-point Arial pure-black font, which tests have shown is one of the easiest to read. Participants were given 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists. They were then distracted with unrelated tasks for a quarter of an hour or so, before being asked questions about the aliens, such as "What is the diet of the Pangerish" and "What colour eyes does the Norgletti have" The upshot was that those reading the Arial font got the answers right 72.8% of the time, on average. Those forced to read the more difficult fonts answered correctly 86.5% of the time. The question was, would this result translate from the controlled circumstances of the laboratory to the unruly environment of the classroom It did. When the researchers asked teachers to use the technique in high-school lessons on chemistry, physics, English and history, they got similar results. The lesson, then, is to make text books harder to read, not easier. According to the study carried out by Dr. Oppenheimer, information to be conveyed is about ______.

A.animal species in a biology lesson
B.three species of extraterrestrial alien
C.written descriptions
D.participants’ prior knowledge

27.This is the 12th book of poems in about 50 years of writing by a great Northern Irish poet who is now in his eighth decade, and who recently recovered from a serious illness. Ageing and that brush with death have profoundly marked this new collection by Seamus Heaney. The change has stripped the poetry back to spare concentration on the small things of life—an old suit, the filling of a fountain pen, the hug that didn’t happen—which then open up to ever fuller significance, the more closely they are examined. It has also made the poems easier to engage with: there are no puzzling Ulsterisms, for instance. Complications have been tossed aside. Words are no longer delved into for their etymological significance as they were in the 1970s. Now they are caressed for their mellifluousness. The collection feels personal—as if it had a compelling need to be written. A decade and a half ago Mr. Heaney told The Economist that once the evil banalities of sectarianism seemed to be receding, his verse was able to admit the "big words" with which poetry had once abounded, soul and spirit, for example. In this collection both are present, at some level. The words describing a simple act—the passing of meal in sacks by aid workers onto a trailer—in the title poem, "Human Chain", transform this 12-line poem into a kind of parable. There is the collective, shared human burden of the act itself—the "stoop and drag and drain" of the heavy lifting—and then there is the wonderful letting go: "Nothing surpassed/That quick unburdening." Is the poet talking about the toil of life, and the aftermath of that toil The poems snatch precious remembered moments. They linger over the sweetness of particulars—vetch, the feel of an eel on a line. They pay attention to the heightened ritual of everyday things. The lines are short but move at a gentle pace and need to be read slowly, as the verse drifts back and forth over its country setting like a long-legged fly on a stream. Above all, and this is an odd thing to say of words on a page, the book feels like handcrafted work. Time and again Mr. Heaney returns to the image of the pen. He began his long career writing of such a pen, nestling snug as a gun between finger and thumb. The gun, we hope, is history. The pen still nestles, fruitfully. The poems are easier to appreciate due to all of the following reasons EXCEPT ______.

A.ulsterisms have faded out in the poems
B.words used are sweet and smooth
C.seeking for originality
D.they seem individual

29.This is the 12th book of poems in about 50 years of writing by a great Northern Irish poet who is now in his eighth decade, and who recently recovered from a serious illness. Ageing and that brush with death have profoundly marked this new collection by Seamus Heaney. The change has stripped the poetry back to spare concentration on the small things of life—an old suit, the filling of a fountain pen, the hug that didn’t happen—which then open up to ever fuller significance, the more closely they are examined. It has also made the poems easier to engage with: there are no puzzling Ulsterisms, for instance. Complications have been tossed aside. Words are no longer delved into for their etymological significance as they were in the 1970s. Now they are caressed for their mellifluousness. The collection feels personal—as if it had a compelling need to be written. A decade and a half ago Mr. Heaney told The Economist that once the evil banalities of sectarianism seemed to be receding, his verse was able to admit the "big words" with which poetry had once abounded, soul and spirit, for example. In this collection both are present, at some level. The words describing a simple act—the passing of meal in sacks by aid workers onto a trailer—in the title poem, "Human Chain", transform this 12-line poem into a kind of parable. There is the collective, shared human burden of the act itself—the "stoop and drag and drain" of the heavy lifting—and then there is the wonderful letting go: "Nothing surpassed/That quick unburdening." Is the poet talking about the toil of life, and the aftermath of that toil The poems snatch precious remembered moments. They linger over the sweetness of particulars—vetch, the feel of an eel on a line. They pay attention to the heightened ritual of everyday things. The lines are short but move at a gentle pace and need to be read slowly, as the verse drifts back and forth over its country setting like a long-legged fly on a stream. Above all, and this is an odd thing to say of words on a page, the book feels like handcrafted work. Time and again Mr. Heaney returns to the image of the pen. He began his long career writing of such a pen, nestling snug as a gun between finger and thumb. The gun, we hope, is history. The pen still nestles, fruitfully. It can be inferred from Paragraph Three that the poet ______.

A.hoped the sectarianism would give way to soul and spirit
B.was able to use the "big words" in his verse later
C.presented soul and spirit in the poems
D.banned talking about big words

30.In the digital realm, things seem always to happen the wrong way round Why is it impossible to finish the task proposed by IIPC

A.Data on the web is too huge.
B.The format of data is a trouble.
C.The growing complex data sets on the web.
D.All of the abov

31.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A./
B.and
C.how
D.when

32.A paradox of education is that presenting information in a way that looks easy to learn often has the opposite effect. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people are forced to think hard about what they are shown they remember it better, so it is worth looking at ways this can be done. And a piece of research about to be published in Cognition, by Daniel Oppenheimer, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his colleagues, suggests a simple one= make the text conveying the information harder to read. Dr. Oppenheimer recruited 28 volunteers aged between 18 and 40 and asked them to learn, from written descriptions, about three "species" of extraterrestrial alien, each of which had seven features. This task was meant to be similar to learning about animal species in a biology lesson. It used aliens in place of actual species to be certain that the participants could not draw on prior knowledge. Half of the volunteers were presented with the information in difficult-to-read fonts (12-point Comic Sans MS 75% greyscale and 12-point Bodoni MT 75% greyscale). The other half saw it in 16-point Arial pure-black font, which tests have shown is one of the easiest to read. Participants were given 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists. They were then distracted with unrelated tasks for a quarter of an hour or so, before being asked questions about the aliens, such as "What is the diet of the Pangerish" and "What colour eyes does the Norgletti have" The upshot was that those reading the Arial font got the answers right 72.8% of the time, on average. Those forced to read the more difficult fonts answered correctly 86.5% of the time. The question was, would this result translate from the controlled circumstances of the laboratory to the unruly environment of the classroom It did. When the researchers asked teachers to use the technique in high-school lessons on chemistry, physics, English and history, they got similar results. The lesson, then, is to make text books harder to read, not easier. We can infer from the passage that ______ influences participants’ performance in the study.

A.fonts presenting the information
B.Arial pure-black
C.Comic Sans MS
D.Bodoni MT

33."Mirror worlds" is only one of David Gelernter’s big ideas. Another is "lifestreams"—in essence, vast electronic diaries. "Every document you create and every document other people send you are stored in your lifestream," he wrote in the mid-1990s together with Eric Freeman, who produced a doctoral thesis on the topic. Prating electronic documents in chronological order, they said, would make it easier for people to manage all their digital output and experiences. Lifestreams have not yet replaced the desktop on personal computers, as Mr. Gelernter had hoped. Indeed, a software start-up to implement the idea folded in 2004. But today something quite similar can be found all over the web in many different forms. Blogs are essentially electronic diaries. Personal newsfeeds are at the heart of Facebook and other social networks. A torrent of short text messages appears on Twitter. Certain individuals are going even further than Mr. Gelernter expected. Some are digitising their entire offices, including pictures, bills and correspondence. Others record their whole life. Gordon Bell, a researcher at Microsoft, puts everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented in his "local cyberspace". Yet others "log" every aspect of their lives with wearable cameras. The latest trend is "life-tracking". Practitioners keep meticulous digital records of things they do: how much coffee they drink, how much work they do each day, what books they are reading, and so on. Much of this is done manually by putting the data into a PC or, increasingly, a smartphone. But people are also using sensors, mainly to keep track of their vital signs, for instance to see how well they sleep or how fast they run. The first self-trackers were mostly über-geeks fascinated by numbers. But the more recent converts simply want to learn more about themselves, says Gary Wolf, a technology writer and co-founder of a blog called "The Quantified Self". They want to use technology to help them identify factors that make them depressed, keep them from sleeping or affect their cognitive performance. One self-tracker learned, for instance, that eating a lot of butter allowed him to solve arithmetic problems faster. A market for self-tracking devices is already emerging. Fitbit and Greengoose, two start-ups, are selling wireless accelerometers that can track a user’s physical activity. Zeo, another start-up, has developed an alarm clock that comes with a headband to measure people’s brainwave activity at night and chart their sleep on the web. As people create more such self-tracking data, firms will start to mine them and offer services based on the result. Xobni, for example, analyses people’s inboxes ("xobni" spelled backwards) to help them manage their e-mail and contacts. It lists them according to the intensity of the electronic relationship rather than in alphabetical order. Users are sometimes surprised by the results, says Jeff Bonforte, the firm’s boss. "They think it’s creepy when we list other people before their girlfriend or wife.\ What does the passage mainly discuss

A.The development of software recording our lives.
B.Gelernter’s ideas.
C.The implement of lifestreams.
D.Emerging of self-trackin

34.This is the 12th book of poems in about 50 years of writing by a great Northern Irish poet who is now in his eighth decade, and who recently recovered from a serious illness. Ageing and that brush with death have profoundly marked this new collection by Seamus Heaney. The change has stripped the poetry back to spare concentration on the small things of life—an old suit, the filling of a fountain pen, the hug that didn’t happen—which then open up to ever fuller significance, the more closely they are examined. It has also made the poems easier to engage with: there are no puzzling Ulsterisms, for instance. Complications have been tossed aside. Words are no longer delved into for their etymological significance as they were in the 1970s. Now they are caressed for their mellifluousness. The collection feels personal—as if it had a compelling need to be written. A decade and a half ago Mr. Heaney told The Economist that once the evil banalities of sectarianism seemed to be receding, his verse was able to admit the "big words" with which poetry had once abounded, soul and spirit, for example. In this collection both are present, at some level. The words describing a simple act—the passing of meal in sacks by aid workers onto a trailer—in the title poem, "Human Chain", transform this 12-line poem into a kind of parable. There is the collective, shared human burden of the act itself—the "stoop and drag and drain" of the heavy lifting—and then there is the wonderful letting go: "Nothing surpassed/That quick unburdening." Is the poet talking about the toil of life, and the aftermath of that toil The poems snatch precious remembered moments. They linger over the sweetness of particulars—vetch, the feel of an eel on a line. They pay attention to the heightened ritual of everyday things. The lines are short but move at a gentle pace and need to be read slowly, as the verse drifts back and forth over its country setting like a long-legged fly on a stream. Above all, and this is an odd thing to say of words on a page, the book feels like handcrafted work. Time and again Mr. Heaney returns to the image of the pen. He began his long career writing of such a pen, nestling snug as a gun between finger and thumb. The gun, we hope, is history. The pen still nestles, fruitfully. Which of the following would NOT be an example of the topics in the poems

A.An eel.
B.Human burden.
C.Vetch.
D.Ritual of daily things.

35.In the digital realm, things seem always to happen the wrong way round It can be inferred from Paragraph Five that the best funding comes from ______.

A.finance from governments
B.company’s sponsor
C.organizations themselves
D.national libraries

36.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.centers on
B.deals with
C.searches for
D.stems from

37."Mirror worlds" is only one of David Gelernter’s big ideas. Another is "lifestreams"—in essence, vast electronic diaries. "Every document you create and every document other people send you are stored in your lifestream," he wrote in the mid-1990s together with Eric Freeman, who produced a doctoral thesis on the topic. Prating electronic documents in chronological order, they said, would make it easier for people to manage all their digital output and experiences. Lifestreams have not yet replaced the desktop on personal computers, as Mr. Gelernter had hoped. Indeed, a software start-up to implement the idea folded in 2004. But today something quite similar can be found all over the web in many different forms. Blogs are essentially electronic diaries. Personal newsfeeds are at the heart of Facebook and other social networks. A torrent of short text messages appears on Twitter. Certain individuals are going even further than Mr. Gelernter expected. Some are digitising their entire offices, including pictures, bills and correspondence. Others record their whole life. Gordon Bell, a researcher at Microsoft, puts everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented in his "local cyberspace". Yet others "log" every aspect of their lives with wearable cameras. The latest trend is "life-tracking". Practitioners keep meticulous digital records of things they do: how much coffee they drink, how much work they do each day, what books they are reading, and so on. Much of this is done manually by putting the data into a PC or, increasingly, a smartphone. But people are also using sensors, mainly to keep track of their vital signs, for instance to see how well they sleep or how fast they run. The first self-trackers were mostly über-geeks fascinated by numbers. But the more recent converts simply want to learn more about themselves, says Gary Wolf, a technology writer and co-founder of a blog called "The Quantified Self". They want to use technology to help them identify factors that make them depressed, keep them from sleeping or affect their cognitive performance. One self-tracker learned, for instance, that eating a lot of butter allowed him to solve arithmetic problems faster. A market for self-tracking devices is already emerging. Fitbit and Greengoose, two start-ups, are selling wireless accelerometers that can track a user’s physical activity. Zeo, another start-up, has developed an alarm clock that comes with a headband to measure people’s brainwave activity at night and chart their sleep on the web. As people create more such self-tracking data, firms will start to mine them and offer services based on the result. Xobni, for example, analyses people’s inboxes ("xobni" spelled backwards) to help them manage their e-mail and contacts. It lists them according to the intensity of the electronic relationship rather than in alphabetical order. Users are sometimes surprised by the results, says Jeff Bonforte, the firm’s boss. "They think it’s creepy when we list other people before their girlfriend or wife.\ Xobni schedules that office workers arrange their self-tracking data according to ______.

A.chronological order
B.the frequency of contacting on the web
C.the alphabetical order
D.the family relationship

38.A paradox of education is that presenting information in a way that looks easy to learn often has the opposite effect. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people are forced to think hard about what they are shown they remember it better, so it is worth looking at ways this can be done. And a piece of research about to be published in Cognition, by Daniel Oppenheimer, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his colleagues, suggests a simple one= make the text conveying the information harder to read. Dr. Oppenheimer recruited 28 volunteers aged between 18 and 40 and asked them to learn, from written descriptions, about three "species" of extraterrestrial alien, each of which had seven features. This task was meant to be similar to learning about animal species in a biology lesson. It used aliens in place of actual species to be certain that the participants could not draw on prior knowledge. Half of the volunteers were presented with the information in difficult-to-read fonts (12-point Comic Sans MS 75% greyscale and 12-point Bodoni MT 75% greyscale). The other half saw it in 16-point Arial pure-black font, which tests have shown is one of the easiest to read. Participants were given 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists. They were then distracted with unrelated tasks for a quarter of an hour or so, before being asked questions about the aliens, such as "What is the diet of the Pangerish" and "What colour eyes does the Norgletti have" The upshot was that those reading the Arial font got the answers right 72.8% of the time, on average. Those forced to read the more difficult fonts answered correctly 86.5% of the time. The question was, would this result translate from the controlled circumstances of the laboratory to the unruly environment of the classroom It did. When the researchers asked teachers to use the technique in high-school lessons on chemistry, physics, English and history, they got similar results. The lesson, then, is to make text books harder to read, not easier. The participants were tested ______.

A.in 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists
B.to answer questions about the aliens directly
C.with very difficult tasks
D.with distraction prior to the related information

39.This is the 12th book of poems in about 50 years of writing by a great Northern Irish poet who is now in his eighth decade, and who recently recovered from a serious illness. Ageing and that brush with death have profoundly marked this new collection by Seamus Heaney. The change has stripped the poetry back to spare concentration on the small things of life—an old suit, the filling of a fountain pen, the hug that didn’t happen—which then open up to ever fuller significance, the more closely they are examined. It has also made the poems easier to engage with: there are no puzzling Ulsterisms, for instance. Complications have been tossed aside. Words are no longer delved into for their etymological significance as they were in the 1970s. Now they are caressed for their mellifluousness. The collection feels personal—as if it had a compelling need to be written. A decade and a half ago Mr. Heaney told The Economist that once the evil banalities of sectarianism seemed to be receding, his verse was able to admit the "big words" with which poetry had once abounded, soul and spirit, for example. In this collection both are present, at some level. The words describing a simple act—the passing of meal in sacks by aid workers onto a trailer—in the title poem, "Human Chain", transform this 12-line poem into a kind of parable. There is the collective, shared human burden of the act itself—the "stoop and drag and drain" of the heavy lifting—and then there is the wonderful letting go: "Nothing surpassed/That quick unburdening." Is the poet talking about the toil of life, and the aftermath of that toil The poems snatch precious remembered moments. They linger over the sweetness of particulars—vetch, the feel of an eel on a line. They pay attention to the heightened ritual of everyday things. The lines are short but move at a gentle pace and need to be read slowly, as the verse drifts back and forth over its country setting like a long-legged fly on a stream. Above all, and this is an odd thing to say of words on a page, the book feels like handcrafted work. Time and again Mr. Heaney returns to the image of the pen. He began his long career writing of such a pen, nestling snug as a gun between finger and thumb. The gun, we hope, is history. The pen still nestles, fruitfully. It can be revealed from the passage that the poet is a(n) ______ person.

A.knowledgeable
B.determined
C.patriotic
D.optimistic

41.A paradox of education is that presenting information in a way that looks easy to learn often has the opposite effect. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people are forced to think hard about what they are shown they remember it better, so it is worth looking at ways this can be done. And a piece of research about to be published in Cognition, by Daniel Oppenheimer, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his colleagues, suggests a simple one= make the text conveying the information harder to read. Dr. Oppenheimer recruited 28 volunteers aged between 18 and 40 and asked them to learn, from written descriptions, about three "species" of extraterrestrial alien, each of which had seven features. This task was meant to be similar to learning about animal species in a biology lesson. It used aliens in place of actual species to be certain that the participants could not draw on prior knowledge. Half of the volunteers were presented with the information in difficult-to-read fonts (12-point Comic Sans MS 75% greyscale and 12-point Bodoni MT 75% greyscale). The other half saw it in 16-point Arial pure-black font, which tests have shown is one of the easiest to read. Participants were given 90 seconds to memorise the information in the lists. They were then distracted with unrelated tasks for a quarter of an hour or so, before being asked questions about the aliens, such as "What is the diet of the Pangerish" and "What colour eyes does the Norgletti have" The upshot was that those reading the Arial font got the answers right 72.8% of the time, on average. Those forced to read the more difficult fonts answered correctly 86.5% of the time. The question was, would this result translate from the controlled circumstances of the laboratory to the unruly environment of the classroom It did. When the researchers asked teachers to use the technique in high-school lessons on chemistry, physics, English and history, they got similar results. The lesson, then, is to make text books harder to read, not easier. The author is ______ about/to the result of the studies in uncontrolled environment of the classroom.

A.doubtful
B.certain
C.cautious
D.indifferent

42.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.processes
B.provides
C.proclaims
D.probes

43.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.districts
B.neighborhoods
C.places
D.regions

44.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.about
B.on
C.underneath
D.within

45.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.recognizing
B.marking
C.acknowledging
D.discriminating

46.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.And
B.By contrast
C.However
D.Then

47.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.have known
B.knew
C.know
D.will know

48.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.changed
B.challenged
C.revised
D.rewritten

49.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.difference
B.postpone
C.separation
D.temptation

50.A new study of the brain is helping scientists better understand how humans process language. One of the patients is a woman with epilepsy(羊癫疯). Doctors are (31) Denise Harris to see if she is a good (32) for an operation that could stop her seizures. They are monitoring her through wire electrodes (33) in her brain. But (34) she is in the hospital, she is also helping scientists understand (35) the brain works with language. The study (36) a part of the frontal lobe called Broca’s area. The electrode implants have shown that the area very quickly (37) three different language functions. Eric Halgren, one of the main investigators, says they found different (38) doing, at different times, different processes all (39) a centimeter. The first function deals with (40) a word. The second deals with understanding the word’s meaning within a sentence. (41) the third lets us speak the word. Ned Sahin, a researcher, says scientists (42) for some time that traditional explanations for how parts of the brain work need to be (43) One such belief is that there is a (44) of language tasks between two very different parts of the brain. One is Broca’s area (45) the front. The other is Wernicke’s area (46) back in the brain. The belief is that Broca’s area is (47) speaking and that Wernicke’s area is responsible for comprehending. (48) the new study shows that Broca’s area is (49) both speaking and comprehension. He says this shows how parts of the brain (50) more than one task.

A.at
B.in
C.on
D.within

试卷来源:易哈佛教育

总分:100分

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